Monthly Archives: March 2015

More New York Records added to FamilySearch.org

FamilySearch.org has added millions of New York records to its free website, including detailed abstracts of New York City vital records that allow searching by family relationship, as well as place, date, and subject name;  passenger and crew lists; Canada/New York border crossings; and National Guard service cards. A list of all New York collections on FamilySearch.org, which can be sorted by the most recently updated, is here.

World War I Research

Megan Smolenyak’s article, “War Numbers: Counting the Irish-born Dead in WWI,” includes data gleaned from the New York, Abstracts of World War I Military Service, 1917-1919 database on Ancestry.com. She reports that 514,859 New Yorkers were “called to arms,” 9,751 of whom were Irish-born, and she also describes her related New Jersey research. The article appears in the April / May 2015 issue of Irish America.

From NYG&B summer intern to historian

The prestigious quarterly of the Westchester County Historical Society, the Westchester Historian, has published an article by former NYG&B summer intern Madeline Bourque Kearin in its winter 2015 issue. The thoroughly researched article  “The Spencer Optical Works in Mount Kisco: The LIfe and Death of a Westchester County Factory Town” makes engrossing reading. Madeline is currently the co-director of Archeological excvavation at St. George’s/St. Mark’s Site in Mount Kisco. Information about the NYG&B summer intern program may be found here.

The importance of good footnotes

A footnote by NYG&B Record author Donn Devine inspired “Ten-Minute Methodology: Proof in a Footnote” posted in SpringBoard, the blog of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®. The BCG monthly series helps genealogists better understand the Genealogy Standards through examples of best practice. Read the footnote (#67 pp. 12–13) or the full article: Donn Devine, “The European Origin of George Falk (1823–1900), Brooklyn Watchmaker,” The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 112 (January 2013): 5–16.