News You Can Use

FamilySearchNews You Can Use in Your New York Research

Recently, FamilySearch.org updated one of its New York collections. The New York, Naturalization Index (Soundex), 1792-1906 now contains 1,493,371 browsable images. This collection cannot be searched, and must be browsed. Perhaps your ancestors’ records are hiding in this collection.

NYG&B at FGS 2015 and RootsTech

The NYG&B will be exhibiting at FGS 2015 in Salt Lake City, which is running concurrently with RootsTech. Stop by our booth to pick up your member ribbon and see the latest offerings. If you are considering joining, we will let you know our latest offerings. And, registration will open for the 2015 New York State Family History Conference at FGS 2015.

To find out how the FGS 2015 and rootstech will work together, see the FGS conference blog at http://voice.fgs.org/2014/09/two-conferences-one-location-how-will.html

Genealogy Event

genealogy event no dateNext Friday, Saturday, and Sunday will be very busy for genealogists in the New York City area! The Genealogy Event has partnered with the National Archives at New York City for its 2014 event, on Friday and Saturday, October 17-18, 2014. The Alexander Hamilton US Custom House, the home of National Archives at New York City, will host the event, and the NARA NYCNARA Research Center will be open both days for research. The event will feature both general and advanced sessions for the beginner and intermediate researcher. The exhibitor hall will feature many genealogical societies- be sure to look for the NYG&B!

Sunday will feature a DNA day hosted at the India Club House, New York, NY. For more information or to buy tickets, visit http://www.thegenealogyevent.com.

News You Can Use

News You Can Use in Your New York Research

Yesterday, FamilySearch.org updated the collection of New York, Queens County Probate Records, 1785-1950. This collection contains 2,852,538 images, but no indexed records. Wills, probate records, proceedings, and accounts can be browsed by date, but will not appear in a search of the website as they have not been indexed. Records of your Queens County ancestors may be hiding in this collection.

New York Archives Week

archive weekThere are several Archives Week events that may be of interest to genealogists.

On October 9, from 3-4 pm, the New-York Historical Society is having an Open House. Attendees will hear talks led by Vice President and Director, Michael T. Ryan, with archivists and curators. Items will be brought forth to demonstrate the breadth of library holdings, with an overview of the New-York Historical Society’s Patricia D. Klingenstein Library, and the New-York Historical Society Museum, and other special collections. If you are interested in attending, reservations are requested but not required. To RSVP, please contact Shawnta Smith,  ssmith4@gc.cuny.edu, 212-817-7053.

Also on October 9, from 7-8 pm, the Oyster Bay Historical Society will host a lecture by George Krzyminski, Proprietor of Certain Books in Westhampton and member of the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America, on collecting historical manuscripts. Reservations are required. Please RSVP by e-mailing or calling O.B.H.S. Director Philip Blocklyn at obhsdirector@optonline.net or 516-922-5032.

On October 10, from 4-6 pm, an Open House featuring New York City history in the insurance archives in St. John’s University Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Library. The open house will give an attendees an overview of the archival collections that include New York City women’s and social history, architecture, famous disasters and conflagrations, business, education, and more. For more information, please email henniga@stjohns.edu.

Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Henry Louis Gates JrOn Tuesday, the first episode of Henry Louis Gates Jr.’s program “Finding Your Roots” aired on PBS. The episode focuses on three celebrities who knew nothing of their fathers’ respective ancestries. The segment with Gloria Reuben was mostly shot in the offices of the NYG&B.
She learned that her white father was 78 years old when she was born, and that he died without telling her anything about his ancestry. During the program, she learned that he was descended from a Jewish family in Jamaica, and her mother, who is African-American, was traced to slaves in Jamaica, including the original family member born in Africa. The research turned up her name, which is a very rare find.  The entire episode is available online here.
Members should check their local PBS stations for dates and times of future episodes.